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K. Alphart Neuburger


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K. Alphart Neuburger: a Review

Wine is as good as life to a man, if it be drunk moderately: what life is then to a man that is without wine? for it was made to make men glad.
    —Ecclesiasticus, ch. 38, v. 1

(Our sample bottle was purchased by us at standard retail.)


About K. Alphart Neuburger

Karl Alphart's eponymous winery is located in the Thermenregion district of Austria, considered an excellent wine-grape-growing zone. The white Neuburger grape's best and highest use is generally thought to be dessert wines, but dry table wines from it are not uncommon (in the region, anyway). The most common description is "full-bodied", but not far behind it is "bland".

The K. Alphart Neuburger has moderate alcohol for a white, typically around 12½%. It is very scarce in the U.S., with even Wine Searcher Pro only showing one or two retailers. The prices run around $15. Neuburger in general is scarce in the U.S.: Wine Searcher pro shows only a few products total (all vintners), most above our $20 price limit (probably dessert wines).


K. Alphart Neuburger: Tasting Impressions

We have now tasted what feels like all the reasonably priced table-wine Neuburgers available in the U.S., which is not a big accomplishment; and those struck us as more alike than different.

The K. Alphart Neuburger was a medium-bodied wine with modest acid, modest minerality, and a nose and flavors that are more floral than fruity, but in any case present but not profound; it was also (like Tinhof Neuberger) very slightly pétillant.

The wine strained hard to have a personality, but, to us, didn't quite make it. Don't mistake us here: it was not at all unpleasant. Served it at a party, one would not discreetly dump it into the aspidistra pot when no one was looking. It is a thoroughly decent drink, and if paid a little attention will reward with modest pleasure. But it does not cry out, or even quietly say, "Look at me, I'm Neuburger." (We would be interested in seeing how many expert tasters could identify the varietal in a blind tasting.)

As we said, the wine gives modest pleasures. Its failing, if we can call it that, is that at least that much and probably a deal more can be had from other white varietals that are not so scarce and are equally inexpensive. Indeed, perhaps its redeeming feature is its modest price; those who estem "QPR" (Quality to Price Ratio) per se might rate it higher than we do. If you opt to try it, you will not likely feel cheated. But it falls victim to the "Wow! I coulda had a V-8!" syndrome.


K. Alphart Neuburger: Other Opinions

On CellarTracker.

On Wine Searcher's Tasting Notes page.

If any of the major wine-review sites have noticed this wine, we can't find the evidence.


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