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The Negroamaro Grape


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About Negroamaro

(Synonyms: Abruzzese, Albese, Jonico, Lacrima, Negro Amaro, Nigroamaro, Purcinara, Uva Olivella)

Background

Map showing the Puglia (Apulia) region of Italy

Negroamaro is a red-wine grape originating in the Puglia region of southern Italy, most notably in the Salento area. It may have been brought to the region as early as the 7th century B.C. from Illyria (a region, and people, then located in the western Balkans).

Nowadays, Negroamaro is an important grape of the region; it is sometimes bottled as a monovarietal, but is more often found as the dominant ingredient in regional red blends (such as Salice Salentino), along with Malvasia Nera and sometimes some Sangiovese or Montepulciano. It is also sometimes vinified as a “rosato” (rosé), and may be “frizzante” (slightly sparkling).

Negroamaro typically produces red wines of deep color with a richly perfumed nose and an earthy quality, sometimes said to have an overtone of bitterness (though that is likely subjective, since in Italian amaro means “bitter”, even though the name component is thought to be from Greek maru or mavro, meaning “black”, and the wines are rarely if ever even slightly bitter). The tannins are usually light or “soft”.

Factoid: Negroamaro may be loosely related to Sangiovese and the white type Verdicchio.

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Some Descriptions of Negroamaro Wines

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Some Negroamaros to Try

(About this list.)

Schola Sarmenti Nardò “Roccamora” Rosso Negroamaro

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks



Leone de Castris Salice Salentino “Riserva”
(Contains c. 10% Malvasia Nera. This is the basic Salice Salentino, not their “Donna Lisa” or other ‘named’ bottling.)

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks



Perrini Negroamaro

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks



Li Veli “Passamante”

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks



Copertino “Rosso Riserva”
(Contains c. 10% Malvasia Nera.)

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks

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For a Splurge

There seem no Negroamaro-based wines notably better enough than those listed above to justify any “splurge” sdpending.

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This page was last modified on Saturday, 18 January 2020, at 1:24 am Pacific Time.