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The Baga Grape


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About Baga

(Synonyms: Baga de Louro, Carrasquenho, Carrega Burros, Poerinho, Tinta Barrada, Tinta da barrada, Tinta de baga.)

Background

Map showing the wine regions of Portugal

Baga is a red-wine grape originating in the Dão region of Portugal. Though it is still produced there, nowadays most comes from the Bairrada region (which is a Portugese DOC), which lies a bit to the west of the Dão region (see image at left).

Baga is a tricky grape to grow: to get full ripeness and tannic content, it needs to have a long season—but a long season puts the grapes at risk of rot owing to the late-season rainstorms endemic to the coastal area. So, as Jancis Robinson puts it in Wine Grapes, “Baga can therefore make the best of wines and the worst of wines: the best, generally those allowed to reach around 13% alcohol, have aromas of forest fruits when young, but develop depth and complexity of black plums, herbs, olives, smoke and tobacco as the tannins soften in the bottle; the worst are thin, pale, green and astringent, especially if the wines have been fermented on the stalks, as used to be the norm.”

Factoid: Baga is the dominant grape in the famous (or infamous) Mateus Rosé once so immensely popular.

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Some Descriptions of Baga Wines

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Some Bagas to Try

(About this list.)

Baga wines are distressingly scarce in the U.S. market. This is all we could find within our price/availability limits (and in some cases, it stretches that “availability” criterion).


Vadio Bairrada

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks



Niepoort “Lagar de Baixo” Baga

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks



Filipa Pato “FP” Baga
(Take care: they bottle numerous Bagas; this is the “FP” bottling.)

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks



Filipa Pato “Dinamica” Baga
(Take care: they bottle numerous Bagas; this is the “Dinamica” bottling.)

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks

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For a Splurge

We could find no reasonably available Baga wines better enough than those listed above as to justify a “splurge” price.

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This page was last modified on Monday, 23 March 2020, at 3:52 pm Pacific Time.