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The Perricone Grape


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About Perricone

(Synonyms: Catarratto Rouge, Niuru, Perricone Nero, Pignateddu, Pignatello, Tuccarino.)

Background

Map showing Sicily

Perricone is an ancient red-wine grape originating in northwestern Sicily, which remains its home today. We say “ancient” and “originating”, though some say Perricone was brought to Sicily by the Greeks more than two thousand years ago—but no one knows for sure. Anyway, it’s been Sicilian for a very long time.

A typical well-made monovarietal Perricone will have firm tannins and slightly bitter flavors of dark fruit (cherries, blackberries, and the like) and dark chocolate, with perhaps overlays of vanilla and spices. The wines have definite tannins, and can be aged to their improvement. As with so many Italian wines, there is a hint of bitterness in the finish (a quality Italians prize).

Factoid: Perricone was long seen as a blending partner with Nero D’Avola, but is now—like many “re-discovered” grapes, especially in Italy—becoming a force on its own.

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Some Descriptions of Perricone Wines

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Some Perricones to Try

(About this list.)

Perricone is not yet well-represented in the U.S. market. What we could find that seems reasonably available is shown below, but if you ever run into a bottle of Feudo Montoni “Vigna del Core”, Caruso & Minini “Naturalmente Bio”, or Centopassi “Cimento di Perricone”, give it a go. (There are more than half a dozen other Perricones on the market, but all scarce and none with published reviews.)


Tasca d’Almerita Tenuta Regaleali “Guarnaccio” Perricone

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks



Castellucci Miano Perricone

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks



Caruso & Minini Perricone
(Do not confuse this with either their “Naturalmente Bio” or their “Sachia” bottlings.)

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
  (The CellarTracker page for this wine includes some other Caruso & Minini wines.)
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks

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For a Splurge

We could find no reasonably available Perricone wines better enough than those listed above as to justify a “splurge” price.

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This page was last modified on Monday, 23 March 2020, at 3:52 pm Pacific Time.