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The Sauvignon Gris Grape


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About Sauvignon Gris

(Synonyms: Fié, Fié Gris)

Background

Map showing the Bordeaux region of France

The grape known as both Sauvignon Gris and Fié is a white-wine grape originating in Bordeaux, where it was a mutation of Sauvignon Blanc; it is now also widely grown in Chile, and is quickly becoming well-stablished in Uruguay and especially in New Zealand.

(The commonest name is Sauvignon Gris, but the French grower widely credited with rescuing the grape from oblivion, Jacky Preys, called it Fié Gris—the old name for it—and Fié is thus also a common denomination for the grape and wine.)

While it has languished in the shade of its much better-known parent, it is now coming to be appreciated for what it is, rather than disparaged for what it is not (which is to say, it is not an “alternative Sauvignon Blanc”). Its nose, in particular, is less ferocious than Sauvignon Blanc’s, but it has a concentrated fruit and citrus quality; moreover, it is less cuttingly crisp, and tends toward a round, rich quality. All in all, it is a fine varietal well worth being known better.

Factoid: French AOC law dictates that wineries are not allowed to bottle Sauvignon Gris as a single varietal; those few who do must label it as a generic white Bordeaux. Weird people, the French.

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Some Descriptions of Sauvignon Gris Wines

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Some Sauvignon Griss to Try

(About this list.)

Château Le Coin Sauvignon Gris

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks



Casa Silva “1912 Vines” Sauvignon Gris
(This is not their “Cool Coast” bottling.)

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks



Cousino-Macul “Isidora” Sauvignon Gris
(This is not their plain Sauvignon Gris, listed separately below.)

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks



Cousino-Macul Sauvignon Gris
(This is not their “Isidora” Sauvignon Gris, listed separately above.)

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks

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For a Splurge

We found no Sauvignon Gris wine better enough than those listed above as to justify a “splurge” price.

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This page was last modified on Monday, 23 March 2020, at 3:52 pm Pacific Time.