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The Brachetto Grape


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About Brachetto

(Synonyms: Brachetto del Piemonte, Brachetto d’Acqui.)

Background

Map showing the Piedmont region of Italy

Brachetto is a red-wine grape originating in, and still almost exclusively grown in, the Piedmont region of Italy. It is used to make not only red wines, but rosés and even sparkling wines. Piemontese red wines labelled “Brachetto” must, by Italian law, be at least 85% Brachetto, and monovarietal bottlings are common. (Brachetto can be, and often is, up to 10% of the Ruché red wines from the appellation “Ruché di Castagnole Monferrato”.)

The dry, table-wine rendition is hard to find (and apparently becoming increasingly so as the sweet bubbly dominates sales ever more), but is well worth seeking out for the occasional offbeat and pleasant light red. Note that almost anything you read elsewhere about Brachetto will be about the sweet bubbly known as Brachetto d’Acqui,; here, we are interested in table wines, not sweeties, so we don’t discuss that wine.

The chief identifying quality of Brachetto-based wines is a clear, distinct strawberry quality, from their aromatic nose through their light-bodied (and usually low-alcohol) flavor. The few dry reds are normally quite dry even though fruity.

Factoid: Wines made from Brachetto grapes grown outside the limits of the legally defined appellation zone cannot be labelled “Brachetto”, so growers in nearby areas often call their Brachetto wines “Birbét”, which means “the little rogue”. (All the table-wine Brachettos are bottlings that cannot legally be called “Brachetto”, though only one is actually called a Birbét—the others have proprietary names: “Anthos” and “Maté”.)

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Some Descriptions of Brachetto Wines

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Some Brachettos to Try

(About this list.)

There are very few dry table-wine bottlings of Brachetto, and not all of those can be found on the U.S. market. The short list below is what there is that is reasonably available.


Matteo Correggia “Anthos”

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks



Sottimano “Maté”

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks

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For a Splurge

We could find no reasonably available Brachetto wines better enough than those listed above as to justify a “splurge” price.

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This page was last modified on Monday, 23 March 2020, at 3:52 pm Pacific Time.