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The Teroldego Grape


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About Teroldego

(Synonyms: Merlina, Teroldega, Teroldeghe, Teroldico, Teroldigo, Tiraldega, Tirodola, Tiroldegho, Tiroldigo.)

Background

Map showing Italy’s Trentino region.

Teroldego is a red-wine grape originating in the Trentino region of Italy—more specifically, in the “Campo Rotaliano”, an alluvial plain between the rivers Adige and Noce. To this day, that plain is regarded as the best site for the increasingly respected Terodelgo grape. (Though nowadays Teroldego acreage in California is steadily increasing.)

(Incidentally, the wine name is pronounced te-ROL-de-go; don’t mis-place the accent.)

Teroldego wines are quite dark in appearance, but soft and quite fruity on the palate; the fruit—of a red-fruit quality—is often overlaid with earthy, almost smoky qualities, and some spiciness. It has suficient acidity to present as fresh and bright, balancing the fruit, and has a fair amount of tannins. It does not need much aging, but can stay solid for many years, up to a decade or more for well-made specimens. The wine tends to finish with a slight bitterness (much valued by Italians and not a few others).

(This is yet another of those fabulous grapes rescued from virtual extinction by the dedicated labors of a single winemaker—in this case, Elisabetta Foradori of the like-named winery, who started her career as a winemaker at the age of 20.)

Factoid: Teroldego comes from a good family, so to speak: DNA testing has showed it to be a parent of Lagrein, and a sibling of Dureza, a parent of Syrah. It is possibly also related to Pinot Noir.

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Some Descriptions of Teroldego Wines

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Some Teroldegos to Try

(About this list.)

Despite its widely acknowledged excellence, Teroldego has yet to make much of an impact in the U.S., so the list below is somewhat scant (at least in the under-$20 range).


Terra d’Oro Teroldego
(A California bottling.)

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks



De Vescovi Ulzbach Teroldego Rotaliano
(They bottle several Teroldegos: this is their basic bottling.)

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks



Bottega Vinai Teroldego

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker review pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks

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For a Splurge

Our nomination is the Foradori “Sgarzon” Vigneti delle Dolomiti Teroldego (it is made with the same grapes Elisabetta Foradori formerly used to make her greatly regarded “Granata” bottling, but now they are fermented in clay amphorae…which seem reminescent of the qvevri used in Georgia).

• This wine’s Wine Searcher “Tasting Notes” page.
• This wine’s CellarTracker pages.
• Retail offers of this wine listed by Wine Searcher
• Retail offers of this wine listed by 1000 Corks

Or, for maybe a little more cost, consider her “Morei” Vigneti delle Dolomiti bottling. The Sgarzon seems perhaps the more interesting wine, but that’s a matter of taste. One noted reviewer remarked that the Sgarzon seemed “More stony than the Morei.”

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This page was last modified on Monday, 23 March 2020, at 3:52 pm Pacific Time.